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J. Jorgenson, J. Kramer, and A.-M. v. Pippich

Abstract

In this article we determine the spectral expansion, meromorphic continuation, and loca- tion of poles with identifiable singularities for the scalar-valued hyperbolic Eisenstein series.

Similar to the form-valued hyperbolic Eisenstein series studied in [7], the scalar-valued hy- perbolic Eisenstein series is defined for each primitive, hyperbolic conjugacy class within the uniformizing group associated to any finite volume hyperbolic Riemann surface. Going be- yond the results in [7] and [11], we establish a precise spectral expansion for the hyperbolic Eisenstein series for any finite volume hyperbolic Riemann surface by first proving that the hyperbolic Eisenstein series is in L2. Our other results, such as meromorphic continuation and determination of singularities, are derived from the spectral expansion.

1 Introduction

1.1. Summary. Let Γ⊆PSL2(R) be a Fuchsian group of the first kind acting by fractional linear transformations on the upper half-planeH:={z∈C|z=x+iy, y >0}. LetX := Γ\H, which is a Riemann surface of finite volume with respect to the natural hyperbolic metric induced fromH. Associated to any hyperbolic elementγ∈Γ, we define a scalar-valued hyperbolic Eisenstein series Ehyp,γ(z, s), which is analogous to the form-valued hyperbolic Eisenstein series defined in [7]; see also [11], section 3. We first prove that the hyperbolic Eisenstein series is inL2(X). The main result of this article is the determination of the full spectral expansion ofEhyp,γ(z, s) based on an explicit computation of the inner product ofEhyp,γ(z, s) with any eigenfunction of the hyperbolic Laplacian (see Theorem 4.1). The knowledge of the spectral expansion ofEhyp,γ(z, s) enables us to also determine its meromorphic continuation (see Theorem 4.2).

1.2. Comparison with known results. As stated, hyperbolic Eisenstein series have been considered elsewhere, most notably in [2], [7], and [11]. In [7], the authors define a form-valued hyperbolic Eisenstein series; their main result, which is an analogue of the classical Kronecker limit formula, is that the constant term in a Laurent expansion at the first pole of their hyperbolic Eisenstein series is the harmonic form dual to the cycle determined by the hyperbolic elementγ∈Γ from which they define their series. In addition, the authors prove the meromorphic continuation and establish the location of singularities when X is compact, though they do not explicitly evaluate the spectral expansion of their form-valued hyperbolic Eisenstein series, nor do they study the case whenX is non-compact. In [11], the author proves the meromorphic continuation of the scalar-valued hyperbolic Eisenstein series using perturbation theory, but, again, does not discuss the full spectral expansion. More significantly, the consideration in [11] restricts attention to the case when X is compact, whereas the computations here simply require X to have finite hyperbolic volume.

In this article, we obtain the main results analogous to theorems of [7] by first explicitly computing the spectral expansion of our hyperbolic Eisenstein series, then we extract all other results as corollaries. In the case whenXis non-compact, we establish the asymptotic behavior ofEhyp,γ(z, s) asztends to a cusp ofX, which has not been established elsewhere, so then we can consider both compact and non-compact finite volume Riemann surfaces simultaneously.

We are confident that the techniques developed here will apply to other types of hyperbolic Eisen- stein series. For example, in [11], the author studies hyperbolic Eisenstein series which are twisted

1

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by modular symbols. In order to apply the ideas from the present paper, we need at our disposal an inner product for functions on H, whose functional equation when acted upon by Γ, agrees with that of this more general Eisenstein series. In [6], the authors interprete the higher-order parabolic Eisenstein series as components of eigensections of certain unipotent bundles onX. We are confident that such an interpretation can be made for hyperbolic Eisenstein series twisted by modular symbols, at which time the techniques of the present article will apply. We will leave this problem for future study.

In a different direction, the article [2] studies the asymptotic behavior of hyperbolic Eisenstein series when considering a degenerating sequence of finite volume hyperbolic Riemann surfaces. In brief, the main result in [2] is that the limit of the (properly scaled) hyperbolic Eisenstein series associated to the pinching geodesic from a degenerating sequence of Riemann surfaces is equal to the parabolic Eisenstein series associated to the newly formed cusp on the limit surface. The method of proof in [2] involves a detailed analysis of the differential equation satisfied by the hyperbolic Eisenstein series. The main results in [2] are reproved in [3] using counting function arguments and Stieltjes integral representations of various Eisenstein series.

2 Background material and notation

2.1. Basic notation. As mentioned in the introduction, we let Γ⊆PSL2(R) denote a Fuchsian group of the first kind acting by fractional linear transformations on the upper half-plane H:=

{z ∈ C|z = x+iy, y > 0}. We let X := Γ\H, which is a Riemann surface, and denote by p : H −→ X the natural projection. The hyperbolic line element ds2hyp, resp. the hyperbolic Laplacian ∆hyp, are given as

ds2hyp:= dx2+dy2

y2 , resp. ∆hyp:=−y22

∂x2 + ∂2

∂y2

.

Under the change of coordinates x :=eρcos(θ) and y := eρsin(θ), the hyperbolic line element, resp. the hyperbolic Laplacian, are rewritten as

ds2hyp =dρ2+dθ2

sin2(θ) , resp. ∆hyp=−sin2(θ) ∂2

∂ρ2 + ∂2

∂θ2

.

In a slight abuse of notation, we will at times identifyX with a fundamental domain inH(say, a Ford domain, bounded by geodesic paths) and identify points onX with their preimages in such a fundamental domain. Given any measurable functions f and g on X, their inner product is defined by

hf, gi:=

Z

X

f(z)g(z)µhyp(z), where

µhyp(z) := dx dy

y2 , or, in other coordinates, µhyp(z) = dθ dρ sin2(θ).

Throughout this paper we will assume thatf andghave sufficiently many derivatives and moderate growth whenX is non-compact, so then we have, by Green’s theorem, the identity

h∆hypf, gi=hf,∆hypgi. (1)

We refer to [1] and [4] for precise details as to when (1) is valid.

2.2. TheΓ-function. The classical Γ-function will play an important role in our computations, so we will summarize here the relevant properties of the Γ-function which we need. Recall that Γ(s) is defined for Re(s)>0 by the integral

Γ(s) :=

Z

0

e−ttsdt t .

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Integration by parts shows that Γ(s) satisfies the recursion formula Γ(s+ 1) =sΓ(s), which also provides the meromorphic continuation of Γ(s) to all s∈C; its continuation has singularities at the non-positive integers, and each singularity is a simple pole with residue ats =−n equal to (−1)n/n! (n∈N). From the recursion formula, one can show that the function

g(x, s) := 2−sΓ(s+ 1)

Γ ((s+ix)/2 + 1) Γ((s−ix)/2 + 1), defined forx∈Rands∈C, satisfies the relation

g(x, s) =s(s−1)

s2+x2 g(x, s−2).

Furthermore, g(x, s) is bounded in the vertical strip a <Re(s) < b for any a, b ∈ R satisfying

−1< a < b. Similarly, and in fact equivalently, the function

h(s) :=Γ((s−1/2 +irj)/2)Γ((s−1/2−irj)/2) Γ2(s/2)

satisfies

h(s+ 2) = s(s−1) +λj s2 h(s),

whereλj = 1/4 +r2j; it is bounded in the vertical strip a <Re(s)< bfor any a, b∈Rsatisfying 0< a < b.

Among the many known identities for the Γ-function, we shall make use of the following funda- mental relation

Γ((s+ 1)/2)Γ(s/2) =√

π21−sΓ(s). (2)

In addition to the above identities, we shall make use of Stirling’s asymptotic formula for the Γ-function, which states that

log Γ(s) = 1

2log(2π)−1

2log(s) +slog(s)−s+o(1), (3) which holds when s → ∞ provideds remains in a sector of the form|arg(s)|< π−εfor some ε >0. In particular, we have for fixedσ∈Randt→ ∞the asymptotics

log Γ(σ+it) =1

2log(2π) +

σ−1 2

log(t)−πt

2 +itlog(t)−it+o(1) (4) with an implied constant depending onσ. For both formulas we refer to [4], p. 198.

2.3. Hyperbolic Eisenstein series. Letγbe a primitive hyperbolic element of Γ. Hence there is an elementσ∈PSL2(R) such that

σ−1γσ=

e`γ/2 0 0 e−`γ/2

, (5)

where `γ denotes the hyperbolic length of the closed geodesic Lγ on X in the homotopy class determined byγ. We note that

Leγ :=p−1 Lγ

=σeL, whereLe:={z∈H|x= Re(z) = 0} is the positivey-axis, and that

Γγ := StabΓ Leγ

=hγi.

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Using the coordinatesρ=ρ(z) andθ=θ(z) introduced in subsection 2.1, thehyperbolic Eisenstein seriesEhyp,γ(z, s)associated to γ∈Γ is defined by

Ehyp,γ(z, s) := X

η∈Γγ

sin(θ(σ−1ηz))s

. (6)

Recalling that the hyperbolic distancedhyp(z,L) frome z to the geodesic lineLeis characterized by the formula

sin(θ(z))·cosh(dhyp(z,L)) = 1e , we can rewrite the hyperbolic Eisenstein series (6) as

Ehyp,γ(z, s) = X

η∈Γγ

cosh(dhyp(ηz,Leγ))−s

.

Referring to [2], [3], [10], or [11], where detailed proofs are provided, we recall that the series (6) converges absolutely and locally uniformly for anyz∈Hands∈Cwith Re(s)>1, and that it is invariant with respect to Γ. A straightforward computation shows that the series (6) satisfies the differential equation

hyp−s(1−s)

Ehyp,γ(z, s) =s2Ehyp,γ(z, s+ 2). (7)

2.4. Spectral expansions. Under the hypotheses made in subsection 2.1, there is a spectral expansion in terms of the eigenfunctionsψjassociated to the discrete eigenvaluesλj of the hyper- bolic Laplacian ∆hyp and the (parabolic) Eisenstein seriesEpar,P associated to the cuspsP ofX.

For any functionf onX, for whichf and ∆hypf are bounded, the spectral expansion is given by the identity

f(z) =

X

j=0

hf, ψjj(z) + 1 4π

X

Pcusp

Z

−∞

hf,Epar,Pi Epar,P(z,1/2 +ir)dr . (8)

We refer to [4] for all aspects of these results, in particular to Theorem 7.3 on p. 103.

2.5. Counting functions. Using the notations of subsection 2.3, we define the hyperbolic counting function Nhyp,γ(T;z) as

Nhyp,γ(T;z) := card

η∈Γγ\Γ|dhyp(ηz,Leγ)< T

Equivalently, the function Nhyp,γ(T;z) counts the number of geodesic paths fromz ∈X to the closed geodesic Lγ onX of length less than T. Using the counting functionNhyp,γ(T;z) we can express the hyperbolic Eisenstein series (6) as a Stieltjes integral, namely we have

Ehyp,γ(z, s) =

Z

0

cosh(u)−s

dNhyp,γ(u;z). (9)

This representation ofEhyp,γ(z, s) plays an important role in [3].

3 Preliminary inner product computations

3.1. Lemma. For any x∈Rand any s∈C withRe(s)>−1, we have

π

Z

0

sin(u)s

e−xudu=πe−πx/2 2−sΓ(s+ 1)

Γ((s+ix)/2 + 1)Γ((s−ix)/2 + 1).

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Proof. We set

f(x, s) :=

π

Z

0

sin(u)s

e−xudu .

Using integration by parts, we arrive at the relation, as long as Re(s)>1, f(x, s) =s(s−1)

s2+x2 f(x, s−2).

As discussed in subsection 2.2, the function

g(x, s) = 2−sΓ(s+ 1)

Γ((s+ix)/2 + 1)Γ((s−ix)/2 + 1) satisfies the relation

g(x, s) =s(s−1)

s2+x2 g(x, s−2).

Obviously, bothf(x, s) andg(x, s) are bounded and holomorphic, andg(x, s)6= 0 in the vertical strip 1<Re(s)<4. Therefore, the functionh(x, s) =f(x, s)/g(x, s) satisfiesh(x, s) =h(x, s−2) and is bounded and holomorphic for alls∈C, and hence is constant ins, meaningh(x, s) =C(x).

To evaluateC(x), let us takes= 0. For this, we have f(x,0) =

π

Z

0

e−xudu= 1

x(1−e−πx).

Also,

g(x,0) = 1

Γ(ix/2 + 1)Γ(−ix/2 + 1). Takingw=ix/2 and using the well-known identity

Γ(w)Γ(1−w) = π sin(πw), we find

Γ(ix/2 + 1)Γ(−ix/2 + 1) = ix

2Γ(ix/2)Γ(1−ix/2) = ix 2

π sin(πix/2). Writing sin(πix/2) =isinh(πx/2), we then have

g(x,0) = 1

Γ(ix/2 + 1)Γ(−ix/2 + 1) =2 sinh(πx/2)

πx .

Therefore,

C(x) = f(x,0)

g(x,0) = (1−e−πx)/x

2 sinh(πx/2)/(πx) =πe−πx/2.

Recalling thatf(x, s) =C(x)g(x, s), the stated assertion now follows.

3.2. Lemma. For any s ∈ C with Re(s) > 1, the hyperbolic Eisenstein series Ehyp,γ(z, s) is bounded as a function of z∈X. If X is non-compact and P ∈X is a cusp satisfying P =τ(i∞) for suitableτ∈PSL2(R), we have the estimate

Ehyp,γ(z, s)

=O Im(τ−1z)−Re(s)) asz→P.

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Proof. IfX is compact, the boundedness of the hyperbolic Eisenstein series (6) follows from the discussion in subsection 2.3, or the analysis given in [3], section 4.1. It remains to determine the asymptotic behavior ofEhyp,γ(z, s), whenX is non-compact andzapproaches a cusp ofX.

Without loss of generality, we may assume that the cusp P of X corresponds to the cuspi∞of a fundamental domain F ⊆Hof X, which we identify with X and fix for this proof. We then choosey0 sufficiently large such that every point on the geodesicLeγ ⊆Hhas imaginary part less than y0. Let now z =x+iy ∈X be such that y > y0, and let L0 denote the horocycle about z at height y0; the hyperbolic distance d:= dhyp(z, L0) from z to L0 equals d= log(y/y0). We consider the counting function

Nhyp,γ0 (T;L0) := card{η∈Γγ\Γ|dhyp(η L0,Leγ)< T}. (10) Now, every element of the set

η∈Γγ\Γ|dhyp(ηz,Leγ)< T

corresponds to a geodesic path L on X from z to Lγ of length less than T, which necessarily intersects the horocycleL0 onX. Letd1 be the length of the portion ofLfrom z toL0, and let d2 be the length of the portion ofLfrom L0 toLγ. Trivially, we have that d1+d2 is the length ofLand thatd1≥d. Therefore, we findd1+d2< T, and henced2< T−d. This analysis proves the inclusion of sets

η ∈Γγ\Γ| dhyp(ηz,Leγ)< T ⊆ {η∈Γγ\Γ |dhyp(η L0,Leγ)< T−d}

which implies the inequality

Nhyp,γ(T;z)≤Nhyp,γ0 (T−d;L0) (11) forT > d. Trivially, we also have that Nhyp,γ(T;z) = 0 for T < d. Recalling the representation (9) of the hyperbolic Eisenstein series, we have

Ehyp,γ(z, s) ≤

Z

d

cosh(u)−Re(s)

dNhyp,γ(u;z)≤

Z

d

cosh(u)−Re(s)

dNhyp,γ0 (u−d;L0).

Using the elementary bound cosh(u)≥eu/2 and lettingv=u−d, we get the estimate Ehyp,γ(z, s)

≤ y

2y0

−Re(s)

Z

0

e−vRe(s)dNhyp,γ0 (v;L0). (12)

The result now follows from elementary counting arguments which imply that the integral in (12)

converges for Re(s)>1 (see [5] and [8]).

3.3. Lemma. For any smooth, bounded, real-valued function φ on X, we have for sufficiently small ε >0the estimate

hEhyp,γ, φi= 2−sπΓ(s+ 1) Γ2(s/2 + 1) ·

Z

Lγ

φ(z)dshyp(z) +O ε/√ s

ass→ ∞, where the implied constant depends on φandε.

Proof. Without loss of generality it suffices to prove the lemma in the case whenσ in (5) is the identity matrix. Then, using the series expansion for the hyperbolic Eisenstein series (6), we can unfold the integral in question, resulting in the expression

hEhyp,γ, φi=

`γ

Z

0 π

Z

0

φ eρe

sin(θ)s dθ dρ sin2(θ).

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For sufficiently smallε >0, let us write

`γ

Z

0 π

Z

0

. . . =

`γ

Z

0 π/2−ε

Z

0

. . . +

`γ

Z

0 π/2+ε

Z

π/2−ε

. . . +

`γ

Z

0 π

Z

π/2+ε

. . .

Givenε >0, there is a constantaεwith 0< aε<1 and|sin(θ)| ≤aε, wheneverθ∈[0, π/2−ε] ∪ [π/2 +ε, π]. Then, we have the bound

`γ

Z

0 π/2−ε

Z

0

φ eρe

sin(θ)s−2

dθ dρ+

`γ

Z

0 π

Z

π/2+ε

φ eρe

sin(θ)s−2

dθ dρ=O as−2ε

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ass→ ∞. Hence we can write hEhyp,γ, φi=

`γ

Z

0 π/2+ε

Z

π/2−ε

φ eρe

sin(θ)s−2

dθ dρ+O as−2ε

(14)

ass→ ∞. Now, using a Taylor series expansion for the functionφwith respect to the variableθ about the pointθ=π/2, we have that

`γ

Z

0

φ eρe)dρ= Z

Lγ

φ(z)dshyp(z) +O (θ−π/2)

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for|θ−π/2|< ε. Observe that

π/2+ε

Z

π/2−ε

(π/2−θ) sin(θ)s−2 dθ=

ε

Z

−ε

u cos(u)s−2 du ,

which we use for simplicity of exposition. Now, on the interval [−ε, ε], we consider the estimate u cos(u)s−2

≤g(u),

where

g(u) :=u 1−bεu2s−2

with bε:= 1 2−ε2

24.

Since the function g(u) assumes its extrema on [−ε, ε] for u = ±b−1/2ε (2s−3)−1/2, we get the bound

u cos(u)s−2

≤ 1

√bε

√2s−3

1− 1 2s−3

s−2

=O 1/√ s

,

from which we derive

ε

Z

−ε

u cos(u)s−2

du=O ε/√ s

(16)

ass→ ∞. By combining (14), (15), and (16), we arrive at

hEhyp,γ, φi= Z

Lγ

φ(z)dshyp(z)·

π/2+ε

Z

π/2−ε

sin(θ)s−2

dθ+O ε/√ s

(17)

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ass→ ∞. Noting that

π/2−ε

Z

0

sin(θ)s−2 dθ+

π

Z

π/2+ε

sin(θ)s−2

dθ=O as−2ε

ass→ ∞, combined with (17), we arrive at the estimate hEhyp,γ, φi=

Z

Lγ

φ(z)dshyp(z)·

π

Z

0

sin(θ)s−2

dθ+O ε/√ s

ass→ ∞. To finish, we use Lemma 3.1 withx= 0 to give hEhyp,γ, φi= 2−sπΓ(s+ 1)

Γ2(s/2 + 1) · Z

Lγ

φ(z)dshyp(z) +O ε/√ s

ass→ ∞. This completes the proof of the lemma.

4 Spectral expansion and meromorphic continuation

We are now in position to state and prove the main result of this paper.

4.1. Theorem. For any s ∈ C with Re(s) > 1, the hyperbolic Eisenstein series Ehyp,γ(z, s) associated to γ∈Γadmits the spectral expansion

Ehyp,γ(z, s) =

X

j=0

aj,γ(s)ψj(z) + 1 4π

X

Pcusp

Z

−∞

a1/2+ir,γ,P(s)Epar,P(z,1/2 +ir)dr . (18)

The coefficient aj,γ(s) is given by the formula aj,γ(s) =√

π·Γ((s−1/2 +irj)/2)Γ((s−1/2−irj)/2)

Γ2(s/2) ·

Z

Lγ

ψj(z)dshyp(z); (19)

here we have written the eigenvalue λj of the eigenfunction ψj in the form λj = 1/4 +r2j. An analogous formula holds for the coefficienta1/2+ir,γ,P(s); it is given at the end of the proof below.

Proof. The hyperbolic Eisenstein seriesEhyp,γ(z, s) is a smooth function onX, which is bounded by Lemma 3.2. The differential equation (7) allows us to conclude that ∆hypEhyp,γ(z, s) is also smooth and bounded on X. The existence of the spectral expansion (18) now follows from [4], Theorem 7.3.

The coefficientaj,γ(s) is given by the inner producthEhyp,γ, ψji, which converges by the asymptotic bound proved in Lemma 3.2, and known asymptotic bounds for eigenfunctions of the hyperbolic Laplacian. Using the differential equation (7) and integration by parts, which is justified again using Lemma 3.2 and [4], Theorem 3.1, we have the relation

λjaj,γ(s) =λjhEhyp,γ, ψji=hEhyp,γ,∆hypψji= h∆hypEhyp,γ, ψji=s(1−s)aj,γ(s) +s2aj,γ(s+ 2), which implies

aj,γ(s+ 2) = s(s−1) +λj

s2 aj,γ(s). (20)

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From subsection 2.2, we recall the function

h(s) = Γ((s−1/2 +irj)/2)Γ((s−1/2−irj)/2)

Γ2(s/2) ,

which satisfies the recursion formula

h(s+ 2) = s(s−1) +λj

s2 h(s). (21)

From (20) and (21), we conclude that the quotientaj,γ(s)/h(s) is invariant unders7→s+ 2; fur- thermore, it is bounded in a vertical strip, say 2<Re(s)<5. Therefore, the quotientaj,γ(s)/h(s) is constant. In other words, we have

aj,γ(s) =bj,γ· Γ((s−1/2 +irj)/2)Γ((s−1/2−irj)/2)

Γ2(s/2) (22)

for some constantbj,γ, which is independent ofs, but possibly depends onj andγ.

We are left to determine the constantbj,γ, which we will do now. Using Stirling’s formula (3) for realstending to infinity, we get

log

Γ((s−1/2 +irj)/2)Γ((s−1/2−irj)/2) Γ2((s−1/2)/2)

=o(1) (23)

ass→ ∞. Using Stirling’s formula (3) a second time for realstending to infinity, we find log

Γ((s−1/2)/2) Γ(s/2)

=−1

4log((s−1/2)/2) +o(1) (24) ass→ ∞. Combining the asymptotics (23), (24) with (22), we obtain

log hEhyp,γ, ψji

= log(bj,γ)−1

2log(s−1/2) + 1

2log(2) +o(1) (25)

ass→ ∞. Now, recall Lemma 3.3 withφ=ψj, namely the formula hEhyp,γ, ψji= 2−sπΓ(s+ 1)

Γ2(s/2 + 1) · Z

Lγ

ψj(z)dshyp(z) +O cs−2ε

(26) ass→ ∞. Using (2), we can rewrite the Γ-factor as

2−sπΓ(s+ 1) Γ2(s/2 + 1) =√

πΓ((s+ 1)/2) Γ(s/2 + 1) .

Using Stirling’s formula (3) a third time for realstending to infinity, we get the asymptotics log

Γ((s+ 1)/2) Γ(s/2 + 1)

=−1

2log(s−1/2) + 1

2log(2) +o(1) (27)

ass→ ∞. Combining (27) with (26), yields the formula log hEhyp,γ, ψji

= log

 Z

Lγ

ψj(z)dshyp(z)

+ log(√ π)−1

2log(s−1/2) + 1

2log(2) +o(1) (28) ass→ ∞. Finally, by comparing (25) with (28), we find

bj,γ =√ π·

Z

Lγ

ψj(z)dshyp(z), as claimed.

Proceeding as in the discrete case, we obtain for the coefficienta1/2+ir,γ,P(s) the formula a1/2+ir,γ,P(s) =√

π·Γ((s−1/2 +ir)/2)Γ((s−1/2−ir)/2)

Γ2(s/2) ·

Z

Lγ

Epar,P(z,1/2 +ir)dshyp(z).

This completes the proof of the theorem.

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4.2. Theorem. The hyperbolic Eisenstein series Ehyp,γ(z, s)admits a meromorphic continuation to alls∈C. The singularities of the function Γ2(s/2)Ehyp,γ(z, s)are located at the points

(a) s= 1/2±irj−2n, wheren∈Nandλj= 1/4 +rj2is the eigenvalue of theL2-eigenfunction ψj onX, with residues

Ress=1/2±irj−2n

Γ2(s/2)Ehyp,γ(z, s)

= (−1)n

πΓ(±irj−n)

n! ·ψj(z)· Z

Lγ

ψj(z)dshyp(z).

(b) s = 1−ρ−2n with n ∈ N>0, or s = ρ−2n with n ∈ N, where w = ρ is a pole of the Eisenstein series Epar,P(z, w)satisfying0<Re(ρ)<1/2, with residues

Ress=1−ρ−2n

Γ2(s/2)Ehyp,γ(z, s)

= (−1)n

πΓ(1/2−ρ−n)

2n! ×

× X

Pcusp

CTw=ρEpar,P(z, w)· Z

Lγ

Resw=ρEpar,P(z, w)dshyp(z)+

+Resw=ρEpar,P(z, w)· Z

Lγ

CTw=ρEpar,P(z, w)dshyp(z)

.

In cases=ρ−2n, the Γ-factor in the above formula has to be replaced byΓ(−1/2 +ρ−n).

Proof. In order to derive the meromorphic continuation ofEhyp,γ(z, s) we use the spectral expan- sion (18). We start by giving the meromorphic continuation for the series in (18) arising from the discrete spectrum. The explicit formula (19) in terms of Γ-functions proves the meromorphic continuation for the coefficientsaj,γ(s) to alls∈C. Now, using the well-known sup-norm bound

sup

z∈X

j(z)|=O √ rj

for the eigenfunctions together with Stirling’s formula (4), we find aj,γ(s)ψj(z) =O rjRe(s)e−πrj/2

,

which proves that the series in (18) arising from the discrete spectrum is locally absolutely and uniformly convergent as a function of s ∈ C away from the poles. The location of the poles calculation and the determination of the residues arising from this part is straightforward referring to the corresponding facts for the Γ-function recalled in subsection 2.2.

We now turn to give the meromorphic continuation of the integral in (18) arising from the contin- uous spectrum. Assuming 1/2 <Re(s)<5/2 and using the residue theorem we can rewrite the integral in question as

√π 4πi

Z

Re(w)=1/2

Γ((s−1 +w)/2)Γ((s−w)/2)Epar,P(z, w) Z

Lγ

Epar,P(z, w)dshyp(z)dw=

√π 4πi

Z

Re(w)=−1/2

Γ((s−1 +w)/2)Γ((s−w)/2)Epar,P(z, w) Z

Lγ

Epar,P(z, w)dshyp(z)dw+

+

√π 2

X

ρpole ofEpar,P(z,w) 0<Re(ρ)<1/2

Γ((s−1 +ρ)/2)Γ((s−ρ)/2)×

(11)

×

CTw=ρEpar,P(z, w)· Z

Lγ

Resw=ρEpar,P(z, w)dshyp(z)+

Resw=ρEpar,P(z, w)· Z

Lγ

CTw=ρEpar,P(z, w)dshyp(z)

. (29) While the left-hand side integral in (29) is holomorphic for 1/2<Re(s)<5/2, the integral on the right-hand side is holomorphic for−1/2<Re(s)<3/2. Since the sum in (29) is meromorphic for alls∈C, formula (29) establishes the meromorphic continuation of the term

1 4π

X

Pcusp

Z

−∞

a1/2+ir,γ,P(s)Epar,P(z,1/2 +ir)dr (30)

in the spectral expansion (18) to the half-plane Re(s)> −1/2. Now, moving the integral along Re(w) =−1/2 in (29) to the vertical line Re(w) =−3/2 using Cauchy’s theorem, we obtain the meromorphic continuation of (30) to the half-plane Re(s)>−3/2; note that this time no further residues occur, sinceEpar,P(z, w) has no poles in the strip −3/2<Re(w)<−1/2. Continuing in this way, we obtain the meromorphic continuation of (30) to alls∈C.

The location of the poles and their residues can finally be easily read off from the sum over the poles of the Eisenstein series in (29) along the same lines as it was done for the discrete part.

4.3. Remark. As in [7], one can consider an analogue of the Kronecker limit formula, which amounts to understanding the second order term in the Laurent expansion ofEhyp,γ(z, s) at a pole.

From the spectral expansion given in Theorem 4.1, one easily obtains the spectral expansion of the function which appears in the next order term of the Laurent expansion at a pole.

4.4. Remark. As stated in the introduction, hyperbolic Eisenstein series twisted by modular symbols were defined in [11], and their meromorphic continuation was determined using perturba- tion theory. In the language of [9], one can refer to such series as higher order, non-holomorphic, hyperbolic Eisenstein series. In [6], the authors study higher order, non-holomorphic, parabolic Eisenstein series using the framework of unipotent vector bundles. Beginning with the linear al- gebra associated to vector bundles, one can define an inner product for smooth sections, which would point toward an inner product for the higher order, non-holomorphic,hyperbolic Eisenstein series defined in [11]. With this, the methods of the present paper can be applied after establishing a spectral theorem associated to unipotent vector bundles.

References

[1] I. Chavel, Eigenvalues in Riemannian Geometry, Academic Press, New York, 1984.

[2] T. Falliero, D´eg´en´erescence de s´eries d’Eisenstein hyperboliques, Math. Ann. 339 (2007), 341–375.

[3] D. Garbin, J. Jorgenson, M. Munn,On the appearance of Eisenstein series through degener- ation, to appear in Comment. Math. Helv..

[4] H. Iwaniec, Spectral methods of automorphic forms, Graduate Studies in Mathematics 53, Amer. Math. Soc., Providence, 2002.

[5] J. Jorgenson, R. Lundelius, Convergence of the normalized spectral counting function on degenerating hyperbolic Riemann surfaces of finite volume, J. Funct. Anal. 149 (1997), 25–

57.

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[6] J. Jorgenson, C. O’Sullivan, Unipotent vector bundles and higher-order non-holomorphic Eisenstein series, preprint, 2006.

[7] S. Kudla, J. Millson, Harmonic differentials and closed geodesics on a Riemann surface, Invent. Math.54 (1979), 193–211.

[8] R. Lundelius,Asymptotics of the determinant of the Laplacian on hyperbolic surfaces of finite volume, Duke Math. J.71 (1993), 212–242.

[9] C. O’Sullivan,Properties of Eisenstein series formed with modular symbols, J. Reine Angew.

Math.518(2000), 163–186.

[10] A.-M. v. Pippich, Elliptische Eisensteinreihen, Diplomarbeit, Humboldt-Universit¨at zu Berlin, 2005.

[11] M. Risager,On the distribution of modular symbols for compact surfaces, Int. Math. Res. Not.

41(2004), 2125–2146.

Jay Jorgenson

Department of Mathematics The City College of New York Convent Avenue at 138th Street New York, NY 10031

U.S.A.

e-mail: jjorgenson@mindspring.com J¨urg Kramer

Institut f¨ur Mathematik Humboldt-Universit¨at zu Berlin Unter den Linden 6

D-10099 Berlin Germany

e-mail: kramer@math.hu-berlin.de Anna-Maria von Pippich

Institut f¨ur Mathematik Humboldt-Universit¨at zu Berlin Unter den Linden 6

D-10099 Berlin Germany

e-mail: apippich@math.hu-berlin.de

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