• Keine Ergebnisse gefunden

Complex Analysis for Physicists

N/A
N/A
Protected

Academic year: 2023

Aktie "Complex Analysis for Physicists"

Copied!
88
0
0

Wird geladen.... (Jetzt Volltext ansehen)

Volltext

(1)

Complex Analysis for Physicists

(2)
(3)

Inhaltsverzeichnis

1. The field of complex numbers 4

2. Complex differentiability and analyticity 8

3. Wegintegrale 12

4. Der Cauchysche Integralsatz 24

5. Folgerungen aus dem Cauchyschen Integralsatz 36

6. Zusammenh¨angende Teilmengen von C 50

7. Isolierte Singularit¨aten 61

8. Wegintegrale ¨uber beliebige stetige Wege 70

9. Umlaufszahlen 75

3

(4)

Conventions: 0 ∈ N. Nn := N∩ [0, n]. The ring of polynomials with coefficients in a commutative ring R is the ring of finite sequences P : N0 → R with the multiplication defined by ei·ej =ei+j and the unit element E :=e0 = (1,0, ...).

1. The field of complex numbers

1.1. Basics. Complex numbers are everywhere. From the definition of elementary functi- ons to the computation of transition amplitudes in quantum field theory they are present.

Whereas for the first purpose we only need elementary properties, for the latter we need deep theorems on complex-differentiable functions. But in order to introduce them, let us first give up our knowledge acquainted so far and slip into the shoes of the people around 1800 interested in extending the field of real numbers (which has been known only informal- ly itself and was finally defined by Augustin Cauchy). For the purpose of algebra, we want to construct fields in which as many polynomials as possible admit a solution. Compare polynomial X2+ 1 over the reals (square root of −1). Assume there were a field (K,+,∗) in which it had a root, let us call this root i. We therefore must have i∗i =−1. Consider now the real linear subspace V of K generated by 1 and i. We want to spell out ∗on V:

(a·1 +b·i)∗(c·1 +d·i) = ac·+bc(i∗1) +ad(1∗i) +bdi∗i= (ac−bd)·1 + (bc+ad)·i That is, we have defined a multiplication · : R2 ×R2 → R2 such that (R2,+,·) is a field: The Abelian group properties of (R2,+) and the distributive law from the left have been verified already (R2 is a vector space), thus we have to verify that (R2\ {0},·) is an Abelian group. Thus let z :=a+bi,v :=c+di and w:=k+li be given, then

(z·v)·w = ((ac−bd) + (bc+ad)i)(k+li)

= (ac−bd)k−(bc+ad)l+ (ac−bd)l+ (bc+ad)k i

= a(ck−dl)−b(dk+cl) + a(cl+dk) +b(ck−dl) i

= (a+bi)· ck−dl+ (cl+dk)i

=z·(v·w)

For the multiplicative inverse of (a+bi), we calculate (a+bi)(a−bi) = a2+b2 6= 0, thus (a+bi)−1 = (a2+b2)−1·(a−bi).

Commutativity follows from commutativity in Rby

(a+bi)(c+di) = (ac−bd) + (bc+ad)i= (ca−db) + (cb+da)i= (c+di)(a+bi).

Thus (C,+·) is indeed a field.

For a complex numberz =a+bi,ais called itsreal partandbis called itsimaginary part. The complex number a−bi is called the complex conjugate of z = a+bi and is denoted by z. Here a word of caution is in order: A frequent mistake is to believe that

·:C→C be complex linear. It is not:

i·1 =i=−i6=i=i1

But of course· is R-linear; it corresponds to the diagonal (2×2)-matrix with diagonal entries (1,−1). As we observed above, the Euclidean scalar product h·,·i on R2 satisfies hx, yi=Re(x·y). The fieldC is therefore a normed vector space via this Euclidean scalar product like in Eq. (12.4) in Section 12.1 of Analysis 1. Convergence of sequences in C

(5)

1. THE FIELD OF COMPLEX NUMBERS 5

is defined exactly as in Section 12.2 of Analysis 1. For z = a +bi, we call |z| := √ zz the absolute value of z, this is, the Euclidean distance from z to the origin. This also gives a nice way to describe multiplication, as on one hand we easily verify |z · w| =

|z| · |w|, and on the other hand, the Euclidean unit circle consists exactly of the points cos(α) +i·sin(α) for α ∈ [0,2π). For every z ∈ C, there is exactly one such angle α to the positive real semi-axis, calculated as arctan(y/x) for x > 0, completed by π on R+·i and 32π on −R+· i and α(z) := π +α(−z) for thoise z with x = re(z) < 0. Then we have z = |z| ·(cos(α) +i ·sin(α)). In the context of complex numbers, the angle α is called the argument of p. Under multiplication, the absolute value is multiplicative, and the argument is additive: arg(z ·w) = arg(z) +arg(w), therefore polar coordinates are appropriate to get a clear picture of multiplication in C.

Theorem 1.1. A map A : C → C is R-linear iff there are c, d ∈ C such that A(z) = c·z+d·z.¯

Proof. Let z = a+bi, then R-linearity of A ensures A(z) = a·A(1) +b·A(i) and thus, using a= (z+z)/2 andb = (z−z)/2i, we getAz =cz+dz forc:= (A(1)−iA(i))/2 and

b := (A(1)−iA(i))/2.

Theorem 1.2. An R-linear mapA isC-linear iff for its matrix(a, b, c, d) in the basis(1, i) we have b =−c and a =d.

Proof. The two equations are easily computed to be equivalent to A(i) = iA(1), which is obviously necessary for C-linearity. It is also sufficient, as then A((a +bi)(c+di)) = A((ac−bd) + (bc+ad)i) = ((ac−bd) + (bc+ad)i)A(1) = (a+bi)A(c+di).

1.2. Topological notions. Recall the notions of connectedness, simple connectedness (Analysis 2 , Section 2.5) and the notion of openness and closedness of subsets (Analy- sis 2, Section 2.6). Recall that a map f : X → Y is called continuous iff f−1(U) is open in X for every open subset U of Y. Now we want to introduce the notion of compactness, an application of which will be a proof of the Fundamental theorem of Algebra in the next section.

Compactness of a topological space T is a property of topological spaces that for the case that T is a metric space is equivalent to sequential compactnes which in turn means that every sequence in T has a convergent subsequence. As all topological spaces in this course will be metric, we are going to restrict ourselves to the latter definition, by sequential compactness. You already had several glimpses of compactness:

(1) Analysis 2, end of Section 2.6: LetC be compact and letf :C →Y be continuous, then f(C) is compact. In particular, for Y =R,f has maximum and minimum.

(2) Analysis 3, Section 4.2: LetV be a normed vector space, thenV is finite-dimensional if and only if every norm-bounded sequence in V has a convergent subsequence (i.e., if and only if V is locally compact).

A subsetAof a finite-dimensional normed vector space is compact if and only it is bounded and closed.

(6)

Exercise: Find examples of sequences in (1) a closed subset of R,

(2) a bounded subset of R,

each without convergent subsequence, showing necessity of both conditions. How can those examples be transferred toRn?

Exercise:Show that +,·:C×C→C,·:C→C and Re, Im,| · |:C→R are continuous maps.

1.3. Application: Fundamental theorem of algebra. Our goal is to prove the following Theorem 1.3. Every nonconstant complex polynomial has a zero locus in C.

and its corollary

Theorem 1.4. Let P be a nonconstant complex polynomial. Then there are r ∈ N, there are zi ∈C for i∈Nr, pairwise distinct, there are mi ∈N\ {0} for i∈Nr, such that

P = Πri=1(E−zi)mi.

Moreover, the above data are unique up to permutation of the tuples (zi, mi) by the sym- metric group Sr (that is, the set {(zi, mi)} as above is unique).

Proof. Apply polynomial division P =SQ+R, deg(R) < deg(Q), to Q = (E −z) for a zero point z, so that application of the division equality toz yields that R= 0. Recall that

C is a field and consequently a Euclidean ring.

There is a direct corollary for real polynomials not using complex terminology at all:

Let P be a real polynomial, then we have P(z) = P(z) for all z, thus if z is in the zero locus, z is as well, therefore if z ∈ P−1(0)\R, then P contains (E−z)(E−z, which is a quadratic polynomial. Consequently, we get:

Theorem 1.5. Any real polynomial is a product of factors E−ri for real numbers ri and quadratic polynomials. The decomposition is unique up to permutation of the factors as

above.

Lemma 1.6 (Asymptotics of polynomials). Let P(z) = P

i=0 ∈C[z] be a complex polyno- mial of degree n. Then there is D >0 such that for allz ∈C with |z|> D we have

1

2|an||z|n≤ |P(z)| ≤2|an||z|n. Proof:Proved in the 1st exercise session:

W.l.o.g. let n ≥ 1. We want to single out the leading term Q := Pnxn and show that it dominates the rest. Thus define R := P −Q = Pn−1

i=0 Pn, then applying the triangle inequality to the equalities R=P −Q and R+Q=P yields, for r(z) :=Pn−1

i=0 |Pn| · |z|n:

|Pn| · |z|n−r(z)≤ |(z)| ≤ |Pn| · |z|n+r(z).

(7)

1. THE FIELD OF COMPLEX NUMBERS 7

For |z| ≥ 1 and i < n we have the estimate |z|i < |z|n. This implies the estimate (0<)r(z)< M|z|n for M := max{Pi|i ∈N}. SettingD := max{1,2M/|Pn|} does the job.

One direct implication of the Asymptotics Lemma is that for A ⊂ R bounded above,

|P|−1(A) is bounded, thus given any z ∈ C, the subset Az := |P|−1((−∞,|P(z)|+ 1]) is bounded. It is also closed due to continuity of |P|, thus it is compact, and it is nonempty (as containing z) , so|P|acquires a minimum M onAz at a pointx, say. Continuity of |P| again implies that there is anr >0 such that Br(0)⊂Az.

Lemma 1.7. Let P be a polynomial and let U ⊂C be open. If z satisfies |P|(z)≤ |P(y)|

for all y∈U (i.e., ifz is a minimum locus for the restriction of |P| to U), then P(z) = 0.

Proof.To center everything atz, we define the polynomialQof degreen such thatQ(x) = P(x−z). We writeQ(x) =Pn

i=0Qixi, thenQ0 = 0 implies thatz is a zero locus. Otherwise choose the smallestk ∈Nn\ {0} such thatQk 6= 0, i.e. Q(x) = Q0+Q0+P

j≥kQjxj. Now we want to estimate the absolute value. The only way to produce a ’minus’ in the involved estimates is to pull it out of the absolute value of two opposite-directed complex numbers, which will be the terms of order 0 andk. Consider the functionsA, B : [0,∞)→R defined by

A(s) :=|Q0| − |Qk|sk, B(s) := |Qk|

2 −

n−k

X

i=1

|Qk+i|si.

We use the first function to control the relation between the 0-th and thek-th term and the second to limit the possibly positive effect of all other terms. Both are real polynomials, thus continuous. As by assumption,A(0) >0< B(0), we can find >0 s.t.A(δ)>0< B(δ) for all δ∈[0, ]. So φ(w) := −Qkwk/Q0 ∈B1(0) for all w∈B(0). In the first exercise session we calculated explicitly (and so showed existence of) thosew such that φ(w)∈(0,1). Now for such a w we calculate (for s:=|w|):

|P(z+w)| = |Q(w)| ≤(∆ inequality) |Q0+Qkwk|+ X

j≥k+1

|Qj| · |w|j

= |(1−φ(w))Q0|+ X

j≥k+1

|Qj|sj

= |Q0| −φ(w)|Q0|

| {z }

=|Qkwk|

+ X

j≥k+1

|Qj|sj

= |Q0| −sk |Qk| − X

j≥k+1

|Qj|sj−k

≤ |Q0|

|{z}

=|P(z)|

−1 2|Qk|sk

| {z }

>0

<|P(z)|

thus our assumption that Q0 6= 0 implies that z is not a local minimum point for the

absolute value of P, which proves our claim.

(8)

Applying the second lemma to the local minimum we have found using the first lemma

now yields the desired zero and proves thee theorem.

It should be noted that the combination of the two lemmas entail not only existence of a zero locus but also helps to localize it within a computable compact region.

Thus we have seen that by just adding a root of one single polynomial (the one of X2+ 1) toRsolves the initial problem completely, i.e., yields a field in whichallpolynomials have a root and can thus be decomposed into linear factors. Of course, it appears very worthwhile to examine this special field Cfurther w.r.t. its analytic properties, which we will do in the rest of the course.

The proof as above is due to Argand (1805). We will perform another, much shorter, proof for the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra after learning a bit about curve integrals in C in some weeks. This situation will be typical for this course: After proving results we will be able to ”through away the ladder we used to climb up the roof”. The entire course will consist in an amazing reduction of complexity such that an A4 paper will suffice for storing all necessary information for the final exam (and such a ”Cheat Sheet”will be an absolutely legal tool for it!).

2. Complex differentiability and analyticity

Recall the definition of differentiability of a function f : U → Rk for U ⊂ Rn open, where f was called differentiable in x ∈ U iff there was a linear map A : Rn → Rk and r : U → Rk continuous with r(x) = 0 and f(y) = f(x) +A(y−x) + r(x)||x−y||, and then f0(x) := A. In the case k = n = 1 we have A(x) = a ∈ R and thus with g(y) := a +sgn(x−y)r(y) we get that f is differentiable at x iff there is a function g continuous in xwith f(y) =f(x) + (y−x)g(y) for all y in a neighborhood ofx, and then f0(x) =g(x). The same definition shall be made here: LetU ⊂C be open. f :U →C and z ∈U, thenf is called complex-differentiableinz iff there is a functiong continuous in z withf(y) =f(z) + (y−z)g(y) (multiplication inC!) for allyin a neighborhood ofz (now a neighborhood inC!). As Cis isomorphic to R2 as a vector space, the question arises how this is connected to differentiability off understood as a mapR2 →R2. As multiplication is an R-linear map, complex differentiability implies differentiability as a map R2 → R2, and following the first section the fact that multiplication is complex-linear leads to the equivalent definition: A map f : R2 → R2 is complex-differentiable iff the differential is complex-linear. This in turn is equivalent to the so-called Cauchy-Riemann differential equations: In their complex form they can be written as ∂f∂z(z0) := 12(fx+ify) = 0 (and the usual complex derivative is ∂f∂z = 12(fx−ify)). In their real form they read as follows:

If f =g+ih, then gx =hy, gy =−hx.

Let now U be an open connected subset ofC.

Just as in the case of real differentiability, one can define inductively higher derivatives f(n) :C→Cby f(n+1) := (f(n))0.

(9)

2. COMPLEX DIFFERENTIABILITY AND ANALYTICITY 9

(1) Let z ∈ C, then the constant function cz : U → C, cz(u) = z∀u ∈ U is complex- differentiable onU (choose g = 0), and c0z(x) = 0 for all x∈U.

(2) The identity f : U → U, f(z) = z, is complex-differentiable (choose g = 1), and f0(z) = 1 for all z∈U.

(3) The map · : C → C is not complex-differentiable: As it is a real-linear map R2 →R2, its real differential is·itself, which we had seen above not to be complex- linear.

A function f : U →C is called holomorphic in z ∈ U iff there is an open neighborhood V of z in U such that f|V is complex-differentiable everywhere (keep in mind that we do not require higher or continuous differentiability a priori!). That definition is supported by the first item below:

Theorem 2.1. (1) Complex differentiability is a local property: Let U ⊂ C be open, then a map f : U → C is complex-differentiable in z ∈ C if and only if for some (and then any) open setV containingz, the restrictionf|V is complex-differentiable in z.

(2) If f :U →C is complex-differentiable in z, then it is continuous in z.

(3) If f1, f2 : U →C are complex-differentiable at z ∈ U, then f1 +f2 and f1·f2 are complex-differentiable at z, and (f1+f2)0 =f10+f20 and(f1·f2)0 =f10 ·f2+f1·f20. If, moreover, f1(z) 6= 0, then f1−1 is complex-differentiable at z, and (f1−1)0 = f0(z)/f2(z).

(4) The everywhere complex-differentiable functions f : U → C form a ring Hol(U) under pointwise addition and multiplication.

(5) Polynomials are complex-differentiable on all of C.

(6) The chain rule holds: IfU, V, W are complex domains and iff :U →V is complex- differentiable inz ∈U and g :V →W is complex-differentiable in f(z) then g◦f is complex-differentiable in z and (g◦f)0(z) =g0(f(z))◦f0(z).

Proof. For the first item, recall that real differentiability is a local property in the sense above, and complex differentiability is then an additional pointwise property. For the second item we only need that complex differentiability implies real differentiability. The proof of the third item works verbbatim as in the reaL case. The fourth item is a direct consequence of the third item. The fifth item is an immediate consequence by the fourth item and the examples above. The last item is a consequence of the real chain rule and the fact that the linear maps R2 → R2 corresponding to multiplication with complex numbers form a

multiplicative subgroup.

Let U, V be complex domains and, then a holomorphic map f :U → V is called biholo- morphic iff it has a holomorphic inverse.

Theorem 2.2. Let U, V be complex domains.

(1) If f0(z)6= 0, then f open at z and locally injective.

(2) f :U →V is bijective and holomorphic and f0(z)6= 0 iff f is biholomorphic.

(10)

Proof: Directly from the inverse function theorem, asf0(z)6= 0 means that as a map from

R2 toR2 we have dzf 6= 0.

Recall rational functions. An important example for a complex rational function is the Cayley transform: f(z) = z−iz+i :C\ {−i} →C, {Im(z)>0} →B1(0).

Decomposition of df intoAdz +Bdz. Thus f holomorphic on domain U and f0 = 0, then f constant.

Theorem 2.3. If f holomorphic and twice differentiable, thenRe(f), Im(f)are harmonic.

Proof.Differentiate the first Cauchy-Riemann equation w.r.t. x and the second one w.r.t.

y, then eliminate hxy =hyx (Schwartz theorem!) from the equations, and you are left with

∆g = 0. Analogously for the other component.

Theorem 2.4. A map f :U →V is biholomorphic ⇔ f is oriented and conformal.

Recall the notion of uniform convergence of maps from subsets of Rn to subsets of Rk. Recall also the geometric series

Theorem 2.5. Let fn be holomorphic on a complex domain U and let fn and fn0 converge uniformly, with f := limfn and g := limfn0, then f is holomorphic on U and f0 =g.

Proof. For all n we have ∂zfn = 0, thus the sequence n 7→ dfn = fn0dz+ 0·dz converges uniformly as well, and the result follows from the familiar corresponding theorem on maps R2 ⊃U →R2 and from the fact that∂z :C1(U,R2)→C1(U,R2) is continuous in the used

topology.

As a direct corollary (as polynomials are holomorphic) we get

Theorem 2.6. Uniformly convergent power series are holomorphic.

Actually, this will be our main source of exampes of holomorphic functions, and we will even see thateveryholomorphic function is locally a convergent power series. Directly from the square root criterion we get:

Theorem 2.7. Given a power series P(z) =P

iaizi, then there is r ∈[0,∞] such that P converges absolutely locally uniformly in Br(0) and diverges for z ∈C\Br(0).

We call this r the convergence radius of P (around 0). We analogously define, for a given power series P, the convergence radius r(P, w) of P around w, if P is written as P(y) =P

ai(y−w)i.

In particular, as uniformly convergent series are limits of polynomials, from Theorem 2.1, Item 5, we immediately get, together with the estimate by the geometric series,

Theorem 2.8. The convergence radius of a power seriesP

iaiziisr(P) := (lim sup(|an|)1/n)−1. The power series defines a holomorphic function in Br(0), and f0 =P

i(i+ 1)ai+1zi, with the same convergence radius, and inductively we get an = (n!)−1f(n)(0) for all n∈N.

(11)

2. COMPLEX DIFFERENTIABILITY AND ANALYTICITY 11

A direct corollary is:

Theorem 2.9. Let a function f : U → C given by a power series around p vanish in an open subset, then it vanishes in the entire ball of the convergence radius around p.

As an example, we define the exponential function exp : C→Cas a power series: exp(z) = P 1

n!zn. The convergence radius is ∞(why?).

Theorem 2.10. The function exp solves the ODE exp0 = exp, and exp : (C,+) →(C,·) surjective group homomorphism, whose restriction onRresp. iRis surjective ontoR+ resp.

S1. We have |ez|=eRe(z).

Proof.exp(C) =:U is open. For everyz ∈C\U we havez·U ⊂C\U. Then connectedness.

For injectivity, we consider exp−1(1), observe periodicity ofA:r7→e2ri and defineπ to be the period of A:

Theorem 2.11. exp(z+ 2πi) =e(z), and every domain not containing two pointsp, q with p−q∈(2πi)·N is mapped by exp biholomorphically to its image.

We define cos(z) := 12(eiz+e−iz), sin(z) = 2i1(eiz−e−iz), coshz := 12(ez+e−z), sinh(z) :=

(12(ez−e−z), those are holomorphic functions on C.

properties, zero loci roots of unity

We note a last aspect: If, forU open inR2a continuously differentiable functionf :U → R2 is is locally a diffeomorphism (which we know is the case after possibly shrinkingU by the inverse function theorem if for p∈U we have dpf invertible). Now, if f is additionally holomorphic, then dpf is the multiplication with a (nonzero) complex number z, therefore the derivative of the inverse function g with g◦f =U atf(p) isdf(p)g =z−1, or, just in one formula,

g0(f(p)) = (f0(p))−1. (2.1)

(12)

3. Wegintegrale

1

3.1. Komplexwertige Funktionen in einer reellen Variablen. In Analysis II wurde eine Funktion f: [a, b] → Rn (stetig) differenzierbar genannt, wenn die Koordinatenfunk- tionen (stetig) differenzierbar sind. Zudem wurde das Integral von f koordinatenweise ein- gef¨uhrt. Wir verfahren nun ganz analog f¨ur Funktionen f: [a, b] → C, indem wir anstatt der Koordinaten nun den Realteil und den Imagin¨arteil getrennt betrachten.

Genauer gesagt, es seif: [a, b]→Ceine stetige Funktion von dem kompakten Intervall [a, b] nachC. Wir sagen,f ist (stetig)differenzierbar, wenn der Realteil und der Imagin¨arteil von f (stetig) differenzierbar sind. Wenn dies der Fall ist, dann schreiben wir

f0(t) = Re(f(t))0 +iIm(f(t))0. Beispielsweise gilt

(eit)0 = (cos(t) +isin(t))0 = cos(t)0+isin(t)0 =−sin(t) +icos(t) = ieit. Zudem definieren wir das Integral Rb

a f(t)dt indem wir den Realteil und den Imagin¨arteil getrennt integrieren. Genauer gesagt wir definieren

b

R

a

f(t)dt :=

b

R

a

Re(f(t))dt+i

b

R

a

Im(f(t))dt ∈ C. Folgendes Lemma gibt eine hilfreiche Absch¨atzung f¨ur Integrale.

Lemma 3.1. Es sei f: [a, b]→C eine stetige Funktion. Dann gilt

b

R

a

f(t)dt

b

R

a

|f(t)|dt.

Beweis. Ein Lemma aus der Analysis II (dort gewonnen aus der Dreiecksungleichung und einem Limesprozess) besagt, dass f¨ur eine beliebige stetige Abbildung g: [a, b] → Rn die Ungleichung

b

R

a

g(t)dt

b

R

a

kg(t)kdt

gilt. Das Lemma folgt nun aus dieser Aussage angewandt auf n = 2, denn unter dem Isomorphismus R2 =C entspricht die euklidische Norm von (x, y)∈R2 gerade dem Betrag von x+iy∈C.

1Ab hier werde ich mich eine Zeit lang sehr eng an ein Skript von Stefan Friedl (Universit¨at Regensburg) halten, das dieser freundlicherweise zur freien Verf¨ugung h¨alt.

(13)

3. WEGINTEGRALE 13

3.2. Die Definition von Wegintegralen. Wir erinnern zuerst an den Begriff von einem Weg (oder auch Kurve genannt) in einem metrischen Raum. Es sei also X ein metrischer Raum, z.B. X =C oder X =Rn. Ein Weg ist eine stetige Abbildung

γ: [a, b]→X.

Wir verwenden hierbei folgende Notationen und Sprechweisen:

(1) Ein Weg γ: [a, b]→C heißt geschlossen, wenn γ(a) = γ(b).

(2) F¨ur einen Weg γ: [a, b] → X bezeichnen wir mit |γ| = γ([a, b]) die Menge der Bildpunkte von γ.

(3) F¨ur einen Weg γ: [a, b]→Cbezeichnen wir mit −γ den Weg, welcher durch

−γ: [−b,−a] → C

t 7→ (−γ)(t) :=γ(−t) gegeben ist.2

Wir wenden uns nun Wegen inC zu.

Definition. EinIntegrationsweg ist ein Wegγ: [a, b]→C, welcher stetig und abschnitts- weise stetig differenzierbar ist. Dies bedeutet, dass es eine Zerlegung a = t0 < t1 < t2 <

· · · < tn = b gibt, so dass die Einschr¨ankungen auf die Intervalle [ti, ti+1] jeweils stetig differenzierbar sind. (Ein Beispiel von einem Integrationsweg ist in Abbildung 1 skizziert.)

3 Wir definieren die L¨ange von γ als L¨ange(γ) :=

n−1

X

i=0 ti+1

R

ti

0(t)|dt.

Es sei nun U ⊂ C, es sei f: U → C stetig und wir nehmen an, dass γ in U liegt. Wir definieren das Wegintegral von f ¨uber γ als

R

γ

f(z)dz :=

n−1

X

i=0 ti+1

R

ti

f(γ(t))·γ0(t)dt ∈ C.

00 11

0 1

00 11

0 1

0 1 0000 1111

a=t0 t1 t2 tn =b γ

γ(t0)

γ(t1)

γ(t2)

γ(tn)

Abbildung 1. Skizze von einem Integrationsweg.

2Der Weg−γ durchl¨auft also die gleichen Bildpunkte, in umgekehrter Richtung.

3Der Name ’Integrationsweg’ r¨uhrt daher, dass man entlang von Integrationswegen stetige Funktionen integrieren kann.

(14)

Beispiel. Es sei U =C\ {0} und r >0. Wir betrachtenf(z) = 1z und es sei γ: [0,2π] → C

t 7→ reit

der geschlossene Integrationsweg, welcher sich auf dem Kreis von Radius r einmal gegen den Uhrzeigersinn um den Ursprung bewegt. Dann istγ ein geschlossener Integrationsweg mit

L¨ange(γ) =

R

0

0(t)|

| {z }

=|ireit|=r

dt = 2πr und das Wegintegral von f uber¨ γ betr¨agt

R

γ

1

zdz =

R

0

f(γ(t))

| {z }

= 1

reit

·γ0(t)

| {z }

=ireit

dt =

R

0

i dt = 2πi.

Beispiel. Es sei f:C→C eine Funktion und es sei γ der Weg γ: [a, b] → C

t 7→ t,

welcher die Punkte a und b auf der reellen Achse vonC verbindet. Dann ist

R

γ

f(z)dz =

b

R

a

f(γ(t))

| {z }

=f(t)

·γ0(t)

| {z }

=1

dt =

b

R

a

f(t)dt.

Wir erhalten also das gleiche Integral wie in Kapitel 3.1.

Lemma 3.2. (Standardabsch¨atzung von Wegintegralen) Es sei U ⊂ C, es sei f: U → C stetig, und es sei γ: [a, b] → U ein Integrationsweg. Wenn es ein C ≥ 0 gibt, so dass |f(γ(t))| ≤C f¨ur alle t∈[a, b], dann gilt

R

γ

f(z)dz

≤ L¨ange(γ)·C.

Beweis. Wir betrachten zuerst den Fall, dass γ: [a, b]→U ein stetig differenzierbarer Weg ist. In diesem Fall gilt

R

γ

f(z)dz =

b

R

a

f(γ(t))γ0(t)dt

b

R

a

f(γ(t))γ0(t)

| {z }

≤C·|γ0(t)|

dt = C

b

R

a

0(t)|dt = C·L¨ange(γ).

Lemma 3.1

Der allgemeine Fall kann durch die Bildung von Summen leicht auf den differenzierbaren Fall zur¨uckgef¨uhrt werden.

(15)

3. WEGINTEGRALE 15

Es seiγ: [a, b]→Cein Integrationsweg und es seiϕ: [c, d]→[a, b] eine bijektive, stetige und st¨uckweise stetig differenzierbare Abbildung. Dann ist

γ◦ϕ: [c, d] → C t 7→ γ(ϕ(t))

ebenfalls ein Integrationsweg, welcher genau die gleichen Punkte annimmt wieγ. Wir sagen, dieser Integrationsweg geht aus dem Integrationsweg γ durch Parametertransformation ϕ hervor. Wir sagen, die Parametertransformation ist orientierungserhaltend, wenn ϕ(c) =a und ϕ(d) =b. Andernfalls sagen wir, dassϕ orientierungsumkehrend ist.

Folgendes Lemma besagt nun, dass Umparametrisierungen Wegintegrale h¨ochstens um ein Vorzeichen ab¨andern.

Lemma 3.3. Es sei U ⊂ C, es sei f: U → C stetig, und es sei γ: [a, b] → U ein Integ- rationsweg. Zudem sei ϕ: [c, d]→[a, b] eine stetige, abschnittsweise stetig differenzierbare, bijektive Funktion. (Wir wissen aus Analysis 1: Dann istϕentweder orientierungserhaltend, also ϕ0 >0 dort, wo ϕ0 definiert ist, oder ϕ ist orientierungsumkehrend, also ϕ0 >0 dort, wo ϕ0 definiert ist). Es gilt:

R

γ◦ϕ

f(z)dz =

R

γ

f(z)dz wenn ϕ orientierungserhaltend ist und

R

γ◦ϕ

f(z)dz = −

R

γ

f(z)dz wenn ϕ orientierungsumkehrend ist.

Etwas vereinfacht gesagt besagt das Lemma, dass sich das Wegintegral nicht ver¨andert, wenn man die Bildpunkte mit einer anderen Geschwindigkeit in der gleichen Richtung

‘durchf¨ahrt’. Das Wegintegral wechselt das Vorzeichen, wenn man den Weg in der umge- kehrten Richtung ‘durchf¨ahrt’.

(16)

Beweis. Wir betrachten zuerst den Fall, dass der Integrationsweg γ: [a, b] → U auf dem ganzen Intervall [a, b] stetig differenzierbar ist. Dann gilt

R

γ◦ϕ

f(z)dz =

d

R

c

f((γ◦ϕ)(t))·(γ◦ϕ)0(t)dt =

d

R

c

f(γ(ϕ(t)))·γ0(ϕ(t))·ϕ0(t)dt

↑ ↑

nach Definition vom Wegintegral Kettenregel

=

ϕ(d)

R

ϕ(c)

f(γ(u))·γ0(u)du =

nach der Substitutionsregel mit u=ϕ(t)

=









b

R

a

f(γ(u))·γ0(u)du =

R

γ

f(z)dz, wenn ϕorientierungerhaltend,

a

R

b

f(γ(u))·γ0(u)du = −

R

γ

f(z)dz, wenn ϕorientierungsumkehrend.

Vertauschen der Grenzen ¨andert das Vorzeichen

Der Fall, dassγ nur abschnittsweise stetig differenzierbar ist, wird ganz analog behan- delt, man muss die gleiche Rechnung nur f¨ur die verschiedenen Abschnitte durchf¨uhren und dann wieder aufaddieren.

Definition. Es seienα: [a, a+p]→Cundβ: [b, b+q]→Czwei Wege mitα(a+p) =β(b).

Wir bezeichnen dann

α·β: [a, a+p+q] → C t 7→

α(t), wenn t∈[a, a+p]

β(t−a−p+b), wenn t∈(a+p, a+p+q]

als die Verkn¨upfung von α und β.

In anderen Worten, der Wege α·β ist der Weg, welchen man dadurch erh¨alt, dass man zuerst entlang α und danach entlang β l¨auft.

000000 111111 000000

000 111111 111

000000 000 111111 111

α β

α·β

Abbildung 2. Die Verkn¨upfung von zwei Wegen.

Folgendes Lemma folgt leicht aus den Definitionen. Wir ¨uberlassen den Beweis als frei- willige ¨Ubungsaufgabe.

(17)

3. WEGINTEGRALE 17

Lemma 3.4. Es sei U ⊂ C offen und f: U → C eine stetige Funktion. Zudem seien α: [a, a+p]→ C und β: [b, b+q]→ C zwei Integrationswege mit α(a+p) = β(b). Dann gilt

R

α·β

f(z)dz =

R

α

f(z)dz +

R

β

f(z)dz.

Es sei nun U ⊂C eine offene Teilmenge und f:U →C eine Funktion. Wir sagen, eine holomorphe FunktionF: U →Cist eineStammfunktion vonf, wennF0 =f. Beispielsweise ist f¨ur jedes n ∈ Z mit n 6= −1 eine Stammfunktion von f(z) = zn gegeben durch die Funktion F(z) = zn+1n+1.

In Analysis I wurde gezeigt, dass sich Stammfunktionen von reellen Funktionen auf einem Intervall um h¨ochstens eine additive Konstante unterscheiden. Das folgende Lemma, welches sofort aus der Bemerkung vor Satz 2.3 folgt, besagt nun, dass die analoge Aussage auch f¨ur komplexe Funktionen gilt.

Lemma 3.5. Es sei f: D→C eine Funktion auf einer offenen Scheibe D. Stammfunktio- nen vonf unterscheiden sich um h¨ochstens eine additive Konstante. Genauer gesagt, wenn F und G zwei Stammfunktionen sind, dann gibt es ein C ∈ C, so dass F(z) =G(z) +C f¨ur alle z ∈D.

Der folgende Satz besagt, dass man Stammfunktionen von Potenzreihen ‘ganz naiv’

bestimmen kann.

Satz 3.6. Es sei

f(z) =

P

n=0

cn(z−a)n eine Potenzreihe mit Konvergenzradius R. Dann besitzt

F(z) =

P

n=0

cn(za)

n+1

n+ 1 ‘Gliedweises Integrieren’

den gleichen Konvergenzradius R und definiert auf DR(a) eine Stammfunktion von f. Zu- dem ist dies die einzige Stammfunktion mit F(a) = 0.

Beweis. Es folgt aus der Anwendung des Wurzelkriteriums wie in Satz 2.7, dass die Potenzreihe F wiederum den Konvergenzradius R besitzt, und dass F in der Tat eine Stammfunktion von f ist. Durch Einsetzen sehen wir, dass F(a) = 0. Die Eindeutigkeit von F folgt nun aus Lemma 3.5.

Folgender Satz erlaubt es nun, Wegintegrale mithilfe von Stammfunktionen, falls diese existieren, zu bestimmen. Der Satz ist ein komplexes Analogon des reellen Hauptsatzes der Differential- und Integralrechnung.

Lemma 3.7. Es sei U ⊂ C eine offene Teilmenge und es sei f: U → C eine Funktion, welche eine Stammfunktion F besitzt. Dann gilt f¨ur jeden Integrationsweg γ: [a, b] → U,

(18)

dass

R

γ

f(z)dz = F(γ(b))−F(γ(a)).

Insbesondere gilt f¨ur einen geschlossenen Integrationsweg γ, dass

R

γ

f(z)dz = 0.

Beispiel. Auf Seite 14 hatten wir den geschlossenen Integrationsweg γ: [0,2π] → C

t 7→ reit betrachtet, und wir hatten gesehen, dass

R

γ

1

zdz = 2πi,

also insbesondere nicht null ist. Es folgt also aus Lemma 3.7, dass die Funktion f(z) = 1z auf U =C\ {0} keine Stammfunktion besitzt.

Beweis. Es sei a = t0 < t1 < t2 < · · · < tn = b eine Zerlegung, so dass die Ein- schr¨ankungen vonγ auf die Intervalle [ti, ti+1] jeweils stetig differenzierbar sind. Dann gilt

R

γ

f(z)dz =

n−1

X

i=0 ti+1

R

ti

f(γ(t))·γ0(t)dt =

n−1

X

i=0 ti+1

R

ti

F0(γ(t))·γ0(t)dt

=

n−1

X

i=0 ti+1

R

ti

(F ◦γ)0(t)dt =

n−1

X

i=0

F(γ(ti+1))−F(γ(ti)) = F(γ(b))−F(γ(a)).

↑ ↑

nach der Kettenregel Hauptsatz der Differential- und Integralrechnung angewandt auf den Realteil und den Imagin¨arteil

Die Aussage ¨uber die geschlossenen Integrationswege folgt sofort aus dem ersten Teil und den Definitionen.

F¨ur z0, . . . , zn∈C bezeichnen wir mit γ(z0, . . . , zn) : [0, n] → C

t 7→ (k+ 1−t)zk+ (t−k)zk+1 f¨urt ∈[k, k+ 1]

den Integrationsweg, welcher f¨ur jedes k ∈ {0, . . . , n−1} auf dem Intervall [k, k+ 1] die Punkte zkund zk+1 direkt verbindet. Wennzn=z0, dann ist der Integrationsweg nat¨urlich geschlossen. Ein solcher Integrationsweg wird auch als Polygonzug bezeichnet.

Interessanterweise gilt auch eine Umkehrung von Lemma 3.7. Genauer gesagt, es gilt folgender Satz.

Satz 3.8. Es sei U = Dr(a) eine offene Scheibe in C und es sei f: U → C eine stetige Funktion. Dann sind die folgenden beiden Aussagen ¨aquivalent:

(19)

3. WEGINTEGRALE 19

000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000

111111111111 111111111111 111111111111 111111111111 111111111111 111111111111 111111111111 111111111111 111111111111 111111111111 111111111111 111111111111 111111111111 111111111111 111111111111 111111111111 111111111111

000000 000 000000 000

111111 111 111111 111

0000 0000 1111 1111 0000

0000 1111 1111

0000 0000 1111 1111

000000 000000 111111 111111

000000 000 111111 111

000000 000000 111111 111111 0000

00 00 1111 11 11

0000 0000 1111 1111

0000 00 1111 11

000000 000 000 111111 111 111

γ(z0, z1, . . . , zn)

z

w

z0 z1 z2

γ(z0, z1, z2, z0) γ(w, z)

z0

z1

zn

Abbildung 3.

(1) f besitzt eine Stammfunktion,

(2) f¨ur jeden geschlossenen Dreiecksweg der Form γ(z0, z1, z2, z0) in U gilt

R

γ

f(z)dz = 0.

Beweis. Es sei also U = Dr(a) eine offene Scheibe in C und es sei f: U → C eine stetige Funktion.

Die Implikation (1)⇒(2) hatten wir gerade in Lemma 3.7 bewiesen. Wir nehmen nun an, dass (2) gilt.

Der Gedanke ist nun, ganz analog zu Analysis I, eine Funktion F durch Wegin- tegrale einzuf¨uhren. Nachdem wir den Hauptsatz ¨uber die Differential- und Inte- gralrechnung nicht zur Verf¨ugung haben, m¨ussen wir dann ‘per Hand’ zeigen, dass die Funktion F holomorph ist mit F0 =f.

Wir betrachten die Funktion

F: U → C

z 7→ F(z) :=

R

γ(a,z)

f(ξ)dξ.

(20)

Wir wollen nun zeigen, dass F holomorph ist mit F0 =f. Es sei also z0 ∈ U. Wir m¨ussen beweisen, dassF0(z0) =f(z0). F¨urh∈C betrachten wir dazu erst einmal

F(z0+h)−F(z0) =

R

γ(a,z0+h)

f(ξ)dξ−

R

γ(a,z0)

f(ξ)dξ

=

R

γ(a,z0+h)

f(ξ)dξ+

R

γ(z0,a)

f(ξ)dξ = (∗)

nach Lemma 3.3

Wir wollen nun verwenden, dass das Integral ¨uber den Dreiecksweg γ(a, z0, z0 +h, a) ver- schwindet. Wir f¨uhren dazu den Term f¨ur die dritte Kante ein.

(∗) =

R

γ(a,z0+h)

f(ξ)dξ+

R

γ(z0,a)

f(ξ)dξ+

R

γ(z0+h,z0)

f(ξ)dξ

| {z }

= 0 nach Voraussetzung

R

γ(z0+h,z0)

f(ξ)dξ

=

R

γ(z0,z0+h)

f(ξ)dξ

=

1

R

0

f(z0+th)·h dt.

denn γ(z0, z0+h) =z0(1−t) + (z0+h)t =z0+th.

Es folgt nun, dass

h→0lim 1

h F(z0+h)−F(z0)

= lim

h→0

1 h

1

R

0

f(z0+th)·h dt = lim

h→0 1

R

0

f(z0+th)dt = f(z0).

↑ daf stetig, siehe ¨Ubungsblatt 2

00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000

11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111

000000000 000000000 000000000 000000000 000000000 000000000

111111111 111111111 111111111 111111111 111111111 111111111 0000000000 0000000000 0000000000 0000000000 0000000000 0000000000

1111111111 1111111111 1111111111 1111111111 1111111111 1111111111 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000

11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111

00000000000 00000000000 00000000000 00000000000 00000000000 00000000000

11111111111 11111111111 11111111111 11111111111 11111111111 11111111111

00000 00000 00000 00000 00000 00000 00000 00000 00000 00000 00000 00000 00000

11111 11111 11111 11111 11111 11111 11111 11111 11111 11111 11111 11111 11111 0000 00 1111 11

0000 00 1111 11 000000

111111000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 111111111 111111111 111111111 111111111 111111111

der Weg γ(z0, a) der Weg γ(a, z0)

der Weg γ(a, z0+h) z0+h

der Weg γ(z0, z0+h)

a

z0

Abbildung 4.

(21)

3. WEGINTEGRALE 21

3.3. Wegintegrale und die Koeffizienten von Potenzreihen. F¨urz0 ∈Cundr∈R≥0 schreiben wir

R

|z−z0|=r

f(x)dz =

R

γ

f(x)dz,

wobei γ: [0,2π] → C gegeben ist durch γ(t) = z0 +reit. In anderen Worten, γ uml¨auft einmal den Rand der Scheibe Dr(z0) gegen den Uhrzeigersinn. Noch einmal anders ausge- dr¨uckt,γ durchl¨auft den Kreis mit Mittelpunkt z0 und Radius reinmal gegen den Uhrzei- gersinn.

000000 000 111111 111z0

r

R

|z−z0|=r

f(z)dz ist das Wegintegral ¨uber

die Kreisbahn um z0 mit Radius r entgegen dem Uhrzeigersinn

Abbildung 5.

Lemma 3.9. F¨ur alle z0 ∈C, r∈R≥0 und alle n ∈Z gilt

R

|z−z0|=r

(z−z0)ndz =

0, wenn n 6=−1, 2πi, wenn n =−1.

Beweis. Wennn 6=−1, dann besitzt die Funktion f(z) = (z−z0)ndie Stammfunktion F(z) = n+11 (z −z0)n+1. Lemma 3.7 besagt dann also, dass das Wegintegral verschwindet.

Den Fall n =−1 hatten wir auf Seite 14 explizit berechnet.

Der folgende Satz besagt, dass man die Koeffizienten einer Potenzreihe durch Weginte- grale bestimmen kann.

Satz 3.10. Es sei

f(z) =

X

n=0

cn(z−z0)n

eine Potenzreihe mit Konvergenzradius R. Dann gilt f¨ur jedes r ∈ (0, R) und alle n ∈ N, dass

cn = 1 2πi

R

|z−z0|=r

f(z)

(z−z0)n+1dz.

In dem Beweis von Satz 3.10 werden wir verwenden, dass wir bei gleichm¨aßiger Konver- genz von Funktionenfolgen ‘Integral und Grenzwert vertauschen k¨onnen’. Genauer gesagt verwenden wir folgenden Satz, welcher direkt aus den S¨atzen der Analysis 2 folgt.

(22)

Satz 3.11. (Konvergenzsatz f¨ur Wegintegrale)Es seiU ⊂Ceine Teilmenge,γ: [a, b]→ U ein Integrationsweg und es sei fn: U → C, n ∈ N eine Folge von stetigen Funktionen, welche gleichm¨aßig konvergiert. Dann gilt

R

γ

n→∞limfn(z)dz = lim

n→∞

R

γ

fn(z)dz.

Wir wenden uns nun dem Beweis von Satz 3.10 zu.

Beweis von Satz 3.10. Es sei r∈(0, R) und n ∈Z beliebig. Dann ist 1

2πi

R

|z−z0|=r

f(z)

(z−z0)n+1 dz = 1 2πi

R

|z−z0|=r

1 (z−z0)n+1 ·

P

k=0

ck(z−z0)kdz

= 1

2πi

R

|z−z0|=r

P

k=0

ck(z−z0)k−n−1dz = (∗)

Nach Satz 2.7 und Satz 2.8 konvergiert die Reihe auf Dr(z0) gleichm¨aßig. Der Konvergenz- satz 3.11 f¨ur Wegintegrale besagt nun, dass wir die Reihe mit dem Integral vertauschen k¨onnen. Wir erhalten also, dass

(∗) = 1 2πi

P

k=0

R

|z−z0|=r

ck(z−z0)k−n−1dz.

Die gew¨unschte Aussage folgt nun aus Lemma 3.9.

3.4. Der komplexe Logarithmus. F¨urϕ∈Rbezeichnen wir mit Sϕ =

rcosϕ+irsinϕ=re r ≥0

den abgeschlossenen Strahl in ϕ-Richtung. In Analysis I hatte man gezeigt, dass die Abbil- dung

exp :

x+iy

x∈R und y∈(ϕ, ϕ+ 2π) → C\Sϕ

z=x+iy 7→ exp(z) = exp(x)·(cos(y) +isin(y)) bijektiv ist. Wir bezeichnen mit

lnϕ: C\Sϕ

x+iy

x∈R und y∈(ϕ, ϕ+ 2π) z 7→ lnϕ(z) = exp−1(z)

die zugeh¨orige Umkehrfunktion. Diese Funktion wird der durch ϕ bestimmte Logarithmus- zweig benannt. In anderen Worten, wenn z =reit, wobei r >0 und t∈(ϕ, ϕ+ 2π), so ist lnϕ(z) definiert und es gilt

lnϕ(z) = ln(r) +t·i.

Aus Gleichung 2.1, d.h. aus der Umkehrregel f¨ur holomorphe Funktionen angewandt auf g = exp, f = lnφ, folgt, dass lnϕ holomorph ist mit

d

dzlnϕ(z) = 1

exp0(lnϕ(z)) = 1

exp(lnϕ(z)) = 1 z.

(23)

3. WEGINTEGRALE 23

0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000

1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111

0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000

1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111

00000 00000 11111 11111

0000000000000 0000000000000 0000000000000 0000000000000 0000000000000 0000000000000 0000000000000 0000000000000 0000000000000 0000000000000 0000000000000 0000000000000 0000000000000 0000000000000 0000000000000 0000000000000

1111111111111 1111111111111 1111111111111 1111111111111 1111111111111 1111111111111 1111111111111 1111111111111 1111111111111 1111111111111 1111111111111 1111111111111 1111111111111 1111111111111 1111111111111 1111111111111

000000 000000 000000 000000 000000 000000 000000 000000 000000 000000 000000

111111 111111 111111 111111 111111 111111 111111 111111 111111 111111 111111

lnϕ exp

Sϕ

x+iy

x∈R und y∈(ϕ, ϕ+ 2π) ϕi

ϕi+ 2πi

ϕ

Abbildung 6.

In anderen Worten, auf C\Sϕ ist lnϕ eine Stammfunktion von 1z. Auf Seite 18 hatten wir andererseits gesehen, dass 1z keine Stammfunktion besitzt, welche auf ganz C\ {0} defi- niert ist. Die Logarithmusfunktionen lnϕ haben also in gewisser Weise den ‘gr¨oßtm¨oglichen Definitionsbereich’ einer Stammfunktion von 1z.

Im Folgenden bezeichnen wir

ln :C\S−π ={x+iy|y 6= 0 oderx >0} → C

z 7→ ln(z) := ln−π(z)

als dieStandardlogarithmusfunktion. Diese stimmt auf den reellen Zahlen mit der ¨ublichen Logarithmusfunktion aus Analysis I ¨uberein.

(24)

4. Der Cauchysche Integralsatz

4.1. Randkurven von Rechtecken und der Durchmesser von Teilmengen in C. In diesem Kapitel werden wir zuerst verschiedene elementare Begriffe einf¨uhren, welche wir im Folgenden immer wieder verwenden werden.

Definition. Es seienz ∈C und es seien a, bpositive reelle Zahlen. Wir bezeichnen z+ (x+iy)

x∈[0, a] und y∈[0, b]

als Rechteck in C mit Kantenl¨angen a und b. F¨ur solch ein Rechteck Qbezeichnen wir

∂Q: [0,2a+ 2b] → C t 7→





z+t, wenn t∈[0, a),

z+a+ (t−a)i, wenn t∈[a, a+b) z+a+bi−(t−(a+b)), wenn t∈[a+b,2a+b) z+bi−(t−(2a+b))i, wenn t∈[2a+b,2a+ 2b]

als die Randkurve ∂Q von Q.

Bildlich gesprochen umf¨ahrt die Randkurve das Rechteck einmal gegen den Uhrzeiger- sinn. Wir bezeichnen die L¨ange 2a+2b der Randkurve des Rechtecks manchmal alsUmfang des Rechtecks.

0000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000

1111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111

00 11

0000 1111 00000000 0000 11111111 1111

000000000 000000000 000000000 111111111 111111111 111111111 0000

00 1111 11

000000 000000 111111 111111 000000000000000000000000

11111111 11111111 11111111

Seitenl¨ange a

z Randkurve ∂Q

RechteckQ Seitenl¨ange b

Abbildung 7.

Definition. F¨ur eine beschr¨ankte, nichtleere Teilmenge X ⊂C bezeichnen wir sup

|z−w|

z, w ∈X als den Durchmesser von X, und

sup

dX(z, w)

z, w ∈X

als den intrinsischen Durchmesser von X, wobei d(z, w) := inf{l(c)|c:I →X, c :z w}.

Wenn X kompakt ist, dann kann man relativ leicht zeigen, dass das Supremum ein Maximum ist, d.h. der Durchmesser von X ist

max

|z−w|

z, w ∈X ,

Referenzen

ÄHNLICHE DOKUMENTE

[r]

In der Datei uebung05.cc im Ordner uebungen/uebung05/ des aktuellen dune-npde Moduls wird ge- zeigt, wie die im Modul dune-localfunctions vorhandene Implementierung dieser Basis

Fachbereich Mathematik und Informatik Sommersemester 2008 Universit¨ at

In einem halbkugelf¨ ormigen Hohlraum eines geerdeten Leiters befindet sich auf der Symmetrie- achse der Halbkugel im Abstand a von der ebenen Begrenzung eine Punktladung q

Das Problem ist, der Join f¨ ur diesen Verband schwer zu

elliptischer Punkt hyperbolischer Punkt parabolischer Punkt Bei Funktionen von zwei Ver¨ anderlichen kann der Typ anhand der Determinante und Spur der Hesse-Matrix klassifiziert

[r]

Da f 0 6= 0, gibt es keine lokalen und somit auch keine globalen Extremstellen im Inneren von D.. Damit m¨ ussen alle Extremstellen auf dem Rand von